10 rock songs that left us all hanging

Some of the best songs ever made try to tell a story from beginning to end. Even though some of these songs can be quite simple, you still want to take your listener on a journey in your headphones as they see the lives of that song playing out in real time. However, when you have a lot of preparation, not all of these songs give you the answers in the end.

After lasting as long as they did, each of these songs seems to go somewhere lyrically and then drop everything completely when they come to the end of the song. That’s not to say the band haven’t put time and effort into making these projects happen. Every one of those hard cuts was probably deliberately intentional…it catches you off guard the moment you hear it.

Most of the time, not everything has to do with the lyrics either. You can easily drop your story without thinking about it, but some of these songs leave you mesmerized in the headphones only to have it all cut out before you’re really ready for it to stop. There’s no right way to end a song most of the time, but these tracks practically give you an audio boost when you first hear them.

Anyone looking to get into concept albums will have a pretty long ride if you start with the wall. Although Roger Waters has created one of the greatest shows in rock history with this album, hearing him navigate the layers of his own psyche to create Pink is much more moving than you might think on first listen. Once the trial ends with Pink tearing down her wall, there’s a bit of a happy ending…isn’t there?

For the most part, Outside the Wall feels like a subtle way to scroll the credits across the album as a whole, being a serene piece of sound design that plays as Pink discovers what it really means to have no boundaries. around him. The sun seems to shine on the final moments of this record until the final seconds when Pink begins to say something before the album is cut. While we only hear him say the first two words of “Isn’t It”, we don’t really know what he was saying until you play the record again.

Once you have the final piece of the puzzle, going back to the first version of In the Flesh on Disc 1 begins with the “where we came in” line, completing the thought Pink has at the end when we start things off. On the contrary, this cliffhanger makes you feel even worse after hearing the ending. Even with all the pain he endured on this album, Pink is doomed to repeat himself over and over again.


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Grace D. Erickson